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    A crane controlled by an operator in a cab located on the bridge or trolley.

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    The slight convex or arched shape given to girders to compensate partially for deflection due to hook load and weight of the crane.

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    The maximum rated load for which a crane is designed to handle (typically rated in tons).

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    As defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission: "A heavily shielded container used to store and/or ship radioactive materials. Lead and steel are common materials used in the manufacture of casks."

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    A crane specifically designed to handle cask loaded with spent nuclear fuel. A crane of this type is typically provided with single failure proof features.

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    A hoist that uses hardened link chain to raise and lower the load of the crane. Chain hoists are electrically driven. The chains average life is such that it typically never needs replacing.

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    This service class covers cranes which may be used in installations such as powerhouses, public utilities, turbine rooms, motor rooms and transformer stations where precise handling of equipment at slow speeds with long, idle periods between lifts is required. Capacity loads may be handled for initial installation of equipment and for infrequent maintenance.

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    This service covers cranes which may be used in repair shops, light assembly operations, service buildings, light warehousing, where service requirements are light and the speed is low. Loads may vary from no load to occasional full rated loads with 2 to 5 lifts per hour, averaging 10 feet per lift.

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    This service covers cranes which may be used in machine shops or paper mill machine rooms, etc., where service requirements are moderate. In this type of service the crane will handle loads which average 50 percent of the capacity with 5 to 10 lifts per hour, averaging 15 feet, not over 50 percent of the lift at rated capacity.

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    This service covers cranes which may be used in heavy machine shops, foundries, fabricating plants, steel warehouses, container yards, lumber mills, etc., and standard duty bucket and magnet operations where heavy duty production is required. In this type of service, loads approaching 50 percent of the rated capacity will be handled constantly during the working period. High speeds are desirable for this type of service with 10 to 20 lifts per hour averaging 15 feet, not over 65 percent of the lifts at rated capacity.

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    This type of service requires a crane capable of handling loads approaching a rated capacity throughout its life. Applications may include magnet, bucket, magnet/bucket combination cranes for scrap yards, cement mills, lumber mills, fertilizer plants, container handling, etc., with 20 or more lifts per hour at or near the rated capacity.

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    This type of service requires a crane capable of handling loads approaching rated capacity continuously under severe service conditions throughout its life. Applications may include custom designed specialty cranes essential to performing the critical work tasks affecting the total production facility. These cranes must provide the highest reliability with special attention to ease maintenance features.

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    Minimum distance from the extremity of a crane to the nearest obstruction.

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    Crane Manufacturers Association of America, Inc. (formerly EOCI—Electric Overhead Crane Institute).

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    Contacting devices for collecting current from the runway or bridge conductors. The main line collectors are mounted on the bridge to transmit current from the runway conductors, and the trolley collectors are mounted on the trolley to transmit current from the bridge conductors.

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    An electro-magnetic device for opening and closing an electric power circuit.

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    A device for regulating in a pre-determined way the power delivered to the motor or other equipment.

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    Commonly used for moving uniform loads continuously from point to point over fixed paths.

    Common types:

    • Powered - continuous belt, split belt, trolley, chain, rollers, etc.
    • Gravity - skate wheels, chutes, slides, rollers, etc.

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    A method of control by which the motor is reversed to develop power to the opposite direction.

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    The top or bottom plate of a box girder.

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    A device for lifting, hoisting and moving heavy weights in suspension attached to a movable boom. Cranes are commonly employed in the transport industry for the loading and unloading of freight, in the construction industry for the movement of materials and in the manufacturing industry for the assembling of heavy equipment. Cranes can be fixed or mobile and can be driven manually or powered.

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    Any lifted load whose uncontrolled movement or release could adversely affect any safety-related system when such a system is required for unit safety. A crane used for lifting a critical load shall be designed with single failure proof features so that any credible failure of a single component will not result in the loss of capability to stop or hold the load.

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    The steel beam that the trolley and hoist ride on, spanning from one end truck to the other. Double girder cranes require two of these beams.

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    A hoist that is normally grooved for true vertical lift.

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    The shaft extending across the bridge, used to transmit torque from the drive motor and gear reduction unit to the wheels.

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    An electrical or mechanical method for reducing the rate of acceleration of a travel motion.